50% of Ex-Employees Still Have Access to Corporate Applications

50% of Ex-Employees Still Have Access to Corporate Applications

Former employees increase the security risk for organizations failing to de-provision their corporate application accounts.

Nearly half of businesses say former employees are still able to access corporate accounts, a new study found.

Ex-employees pose a big security risk: Twenty percent of businesses have experienced data breaches by former staff, according to OneLogin’s new “Curse of the Ex-Employees” report. Of those, nearly half claim that more than 10% of all data breaches are the direct result of former workers.

Researchers conducted 500 interviews among IT employees who are at least partially responsible for security and make decisions about hardware, software, and cloud-based services. Half say ex-employees’ accounts remain active for longer than a day after they leave the company; 20% take a month or more to deprovision employees after they leave.

The more engrained someone is in an organization, the harder it is to deprovision. Two-thirds of respondents report on-site employees are toughest. Half of respondents don’t use automated deprovisioning and must manually remove access to corporate applications, a lengthy process that increases the chance former employees can still access their accounts.

Read more details here.

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